The G-CAT for #MyScienceMay

So it might have been a hot minute since I’ve posted (sorry about that!). But rest assured, new content is in the works, and will be up shortly. In the meantime, however, I’m delighted to announce that not only will I be participating in the science communication event #MyScienceMay (as organised by Avid Research and Let’s Talk SciComm), but that The G-CAT is now live on Instagram! You can check me out @thegeneticscat, where I’ll be posting a combination of brief insights into my research; short summaries of relevant conservation genetics topics; animal facts and wildlife photography; and more of my day-to-day.

That’s not to say the long-form blog approach is going anywhere: I still very much enjoy writing these lengthier, more descriptive posts. But the Instagram will provide some bite-sized content in between the longer posts to provide more regular and easily digestible information (that’s the aim, anyway).

With that said, I hope you’ll tune in throughout May to see what I’ve been up to and my current projects. I’ll be alternating context between Instagram and my Twitter (@fishlogeography), but may attempt to collate it all here somewhere.

Building Blueprints – How to assemble a genome

The utility of a reference genome

In the 18 years since the completion of the Human Genome Project, the practicality of assembling full genomes for a wide range of taxa beyond ourselves has only improved. While model taxa systems have achieved genomes before many others, it is now possible for whole genomes to be assembled for a range of non-model organisms as well. But how do we assemble the genome of a species for the very first time (often de novo – literally “from the new”)? What can we do with this genome? Why is it so useful? Let’s delve into the process and outcomes of genome assembly a little more.

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Incomplete lineage sorting through Pachinko – a visual analogy

Reconstructing evolutionary history

Unravelling the evolutionary history of organisms – one of the main goals of phylogenetic research – remains a challenging prospect due to a number of theoretical and analytical aspects. Particularly, trying to reconstruct evolutionary patterns based on current genetic data (the most common way phylogenetic trees are estimated) is prone to the erroneous influence of some secondary factors. One of these is referred to as ‘incomplete lineage sorting’, which can have a major effect on how phylogenetic relationships are estimated and the statistical confidence we may have around these patterns. Today, we’re going to take a look at incomplete lineage sorting (shortened to ILS for brevity herein) using a game-based analogy – a Pachinko machine. Or, if you’d rather, the same general analogy also works for those creepy clown carnival games, but I prefer the less frightening alternative.

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The G-CAT in 2020

The new year and decade

It’s been a few minutes (okay, several weeks) since the last post here on The G-CAT. Naturally, over that time I’ve spent holidays with both my own family and my partner’s family. Hopefully, you’ve enjoyed your own Christmas/New Year/Other-Non-Denominational-Celebrations break (and for us Aussies, that you’ve managed to avoid much of the devastation of the recent bushfire epidemic).

Because of this period of time (and a few other more pressing deadlines I had for the start of the new year), I haven’t prepared a new post in some time. However, I’d like to take this time to address how the nature of this blog might change of the next year or so (and into the future).

A new schedule

For those of you who keep more up-to-date with my academic progress, you’ll be aware that this year is the final year of my PhD. As it stands, I’m due to submit my thesis in August of this year (which feels much, much sooner than it really is). Similarly, for anyone who has ever interacted with a PhD student in the final year of their studies, you’ll also be aware that this can be a time of high stress, stacking deadlines and the overall impending doom of D-Day (thesis submission).

In light of all of this, I have decided to move away from the more predictable fortnightly post routine in favour of a more organic timetable. This will likely mean a fairly significant reduction in the frequency of blog posts, whereby I will post as a topic comes into my mind or when it appears relevant to other parts of my studies (e.g. in reading for writing manuscripts, etc.). This decision has also been playing on my mind for some time to also balance the quality of the posts I write: in some circumstances, I feel like the consistent deadline of once per fortnight causes some posts to suffer a little as I rush to produce something at least in the vicinity of every second Wednesday.

The future of The G-CAT

It is not my intention to completely abandon this project: The G-CAT is something that I have invested a fair time and inspiration into and provides a solid avenue for science communication. As always, my inbox (on whichever platform you choose) is wide open for suggestions on topics of discussion. I’m looking forward to a more organic schedule that will allow me to properly explore and expand on the topics of interest whilst maintaining a healthy balance of PhD progression and down-time.

Here’s to 2020!